Written Elsewhere: Frat Rap and a Final Word on Macklemore

After we posted no fewer than three entries about Macklemore and Lewis’ The Heist in a week (one review, one reaction and one fine guest-post traversing between the personal and the artistic), I swore that I was never going to write about Macklemore again (or at least not for a few weeks!). I still couldn’t quite figure out how to evaluate Macklemore fairly.

Vanilla Ice wasn’t ‘real’. And MC Hammer was?

Since the birth of hip-hop and its spread to the suburbs on the airwaves and through MTV thanks to unthreatening dance artists and, then, even later after gangtsa rap dominated the landscape, a rapper’s persona was in part defined by his color. The early pioneers, the Beastie Boys, were really just shouting. Vanilla Ice was a wannabe’s wannabe. Eminem was an exception because of his experience and his unique ability to rap at a machine gun pace and twist surprising rhymes.

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The Heist: “A Life Lived for Art is Never a Life Wasted”

Note: Today we bring you yet another post about Macklemore–who recently won the MTV VMA for best Hip-Hop artist–from a guest who has been a reader of the blog for a little while and a friend of the elder for much longer. The debate on Macklemore’s place in hip-hop seems to be flowing rather than ebbing, so we can’t promise we won’t chime in on the subject again. 

For now, here’s our friend and another teacher-extraordinaire, The Mr. and Only Moe.

I must start by saying that I grateful to the brothersj for allowing me to be a part of their endeavor, especially since my introduction is on a topic for which they have both sufficiently posted already. Before delving deeper into Macklemore and Lewis’s The Heist, some transparency is required. I agree with the elderj that my leftist political leaning effects my perspective on this album, but also I have found that the way in which I come by an album, where I am at in my life, greatly effects my affinity for an album as well, sometimes more.

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