Songs of the Year—1997

Go ahead you can laugh all you want
I got my philosophy
Keeps my feet on the ground
And I trust it like the ground
That’s why my philosophy
Keeps me walking when I’m falling down
–Ben Folds Five

Songs of the Year: “Super Bon Bon,” Soul Coughing; “Bury Me,” Guster

Runners-up: “Philosophy”, Ben Folds Five; “Stickshifts and Safetybelts,” Cake

Honorable Mentions: “Firestarter,” The Prodigy; “Tubthumper”, Chumbawumba; “Hypnotize,” Notorious B. I. G.

In 1997, I went to college. I had the grandest of opportunities to re-invent myself. In life, rare are the occasions when you can literally trade in your old mask for a new one. So, I changed my clothes (a little); I broke up with a girl over Limp Bizkit and I went off to conquer the world.

Or something like that.

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Review of Francois Noudelmann, “The Philosopher’s Touch: Sartre, Nietzsche, and Barthes at the Piano” | Inside Higher Ed

At a time when fewer youths are learning music in school and we gut arts’ budgets, maybe we should remember that music is for more than entertainment.

As my brother and I often try to show, the music we listen to makes us contemplate not just sound, but the world that sound inhabits and the place we have within it.

But we’re not terribly original in this…perhaps just a bit intense in the way we approach it. The ancient greek philosopher Pythagoras believed saw mathematics as a language that could explain or express the world he found around him–Plato drew on this and saw music not just as a great way to train the minds of his elite, but also as a way to understand the world. Harmony, for Plato, and the ratios embedded in music, were part of the secret fabric of reality.

Interested in the connection between philosophy and music  or the connection between deep thought and musical thought? Here’s a neat review of a book that looks at some famous thinkers and their music habits…

Review of Francois Noudelmann, “The Philosopher’s Touch: Sartre, Nietzsche, and Barthes at the Piano” | Inside Higher Ed.

Philosophers love music. there. Oh, and musicians sometimes like philosophers too.

 

And since we’re talking about philsophers and music, I cannot resist this old Monty Python tune: