The Worst Concert Ever

“Why should I change? He’s the one who sucks.” Michael Bolton (Office Space)


While many of our comments on and anecdotes about music have to do with music merely as sound, as the score for charged moments in our lives or the cue to dial up vivid memories, music also surrounds us in tactile and physical ways. The Younger J and I have, at different points in our lives, attended many and varied concerts (and too few together). Seeing an artist live and as part of a community of listeners can drastically change the way you engage with music. The live performance returns music to the breathing pulse of the living from the frozen state of recorded sound.

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Green Jelly and Selective Amnesia

So, my friend the Historian, (who is a guest poster under his nom de plume Professor Mortis) writes a pretty cool blog The League of Dead Films, where he and a partner supply movies of the day and often reviews of all types of films.  The blog is fun and more than informative. Check it out.

As with many film enthusiasts, the Historian has long been a lover of the obscure, the absurd, and the historicallly significant or anomalous. (I am sure he still shudders when he considers my across-the-board refusal to watch films in black-and-white.) When we were roommates over a decade ago, he provided me with a private education in the twisted, pathetic and forgotten (from the seminal Blood Feast through the original Willard and the perverse Deadly Weapons.)

Don’t fear. I am not going to start writing about movies. What I am interested in, though, is the way that movie lovers exult in bad movies. Or even the way that casual film fans enjoy bad entertainment. (See, for example the sports and pop culture enthusiast Bill Simmons’ recent thoughts about The Island of Dr. Moreau). There are so many bad films made all the time that we need someone like the good professor to remind us of the more precious and odd moments in our film history.

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The Worst Concert Ever

“Why should I change? He’s the one who sucks.” Michael Bolton (Office Space)


While many of our comments on and anecdotes about music have to do with music merely as sound, as the score for charged moments in our lives or the cue to dial up vivid memories, music also surrounds us in tactile and physical ways. The Younger J and I have, at different points in our lives, attended many and varied concerts (and too few together). Seeing an artist live and as part of a community of listeners can drastically change the way you engage with music. The live performance returns music to the breathing pulse of the living from the frozen state of recorded sound.

Continue reading